It’s All About the Kids. And Party.

what did that funny man say?

I just took a quick tour of the required Form 460 campaign documents for the “committee” that is pushing for the $190,000,000 Fullerton Elementary School Bond measure on next Tuesday’s ballot. Sure enough, Schedule A, the contributor list for mid-January to mid-February was studded with district contractors, architects and other commercial hangers-on whose livelihood depends upon the goodwill of the administrators who no doubt illegally leaned on them to pony up. It was also turned in grossly incomplete and hopefully isn’t representative of the quality of  homework turned in required by students in the district.

The list was also remarkable for the relatively few district employees willing to drop their proverbial dime to the cause a few dozen. Remember that the district has hundreds of employees who pull down $100,000 or more, annually. In some cases, a helluva lot more.

But what really caught my attention was Schedule G, a page of which I faithfully reproduce below:

Mardi Gras came early…

Here we see an “independent agent” named Rob Coghlan dishing out $3500 for fundraising parties at a couple of downtown restaurants. How amusing. Well, hell, I like a good time as much as the next Irish-American, but really, $3500 to try to to raise money? Or maybe it was just to recognize previous camp follower donors. Who knows? But I do know that Robert Coghlan is an administrator in the school district. I sure hope he hasn’t been working during company time to lean on district contractors or employees for donations to his cause; or that maybe he really likes depositions.

15 thoughts on “It’s All About the Kids. And Party.

  1. Education Uber Alles!

    Deposition, indeed. If the cheaters actually win they’re gonna get sued. And then Mr. Coghlan can explain his activities and his texts under oath. I wonder how he got the short straw.

    Reply
  2. John R Hogerhuis

    You make $100k sound like a lot. $100k “OR MORE.” In fact it tends to be exactly around there unless you’re talking about certain admins.

    This is Southern California, teachers actually tend to live in the communities where they teach.

    Voting yes on all 3. This is for you kids. Finish school, or you’ll end up angry conservative and libertarian asshats with nothing to do but blog about everyone you hate.

    Reply
    1. John R. Hoogerbooger

      Damn. We get sooooo angry sometimes. We have medication and I keep telling us to take it every day or bad things will happen to us, but I don’t always listen to ourselves.

      Reply
    2. Facts is Facts

      Yes, let’s pay groundskeeper Willy a hundred K just, well, just because we can! Janitors have to live in the community too!

      Reply
    3. Anonymous

      So naturally you’re all in on the district bigsghots holding a party for the high-roll suckers, right? All about the kids.

      Reply
  3. Van get it da artiste

    The new frontier in education is 21st technology which is about dissolving the traditional, confining walls of the (old) school to favor bringing students into the world. As higher education shifts to online learning so, is the elementary level. Fifth to eighth graders deserve funds spent on quality curriculum materials, science, art, music, dance taught not by someone who “took a class or two in these subjects” in a makeshift lab, studio aka empty classroom occasionally used as storage on a school’s campus, but by people who have studied these subjects and devoted themselves to endeavor in them in their appropriate environment. As a Fullerton lifer who saw the Fullerton main library debacle where monies spent on enlarging architectural decor on the increasingly obsolete concept of housing paper books instead of investing to upgrade and expand to the community the information highway, the internet, I know misallocation of tax dollars will occur by spending millions on beautification of actual buildings, landscape, in sum interior design complemented by architecture. Absent will be the response to the world’s growing demand that today’s children must become multifaceted in knowledge adults to compete in the global economy. And this knowledge begins not in college, it begins at the elementary level. The readers of this blog know from our experience with the civic pillars of Fullerton, our tax dollars will be spent on making pretty rooms.

    Reply
    1. Vote NO

      Tearing down good football stadiums, pools, basketball courts, theaters, etc, just to build “newer” ones, does not justify a yes vote.

      Reply
  4. Van get it da artiste

    After thought, make pretty rooms at an inflated cost to taxpayers while developers financially support Fullerton’s regime, but just my opinion

    Reply

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