Never Forget

It’s been a year since the election of 2010. But let’s take a moment to reflect upon those who were endorsed by the public safety unions in Fullerton:

 

Right. Bankhead, McKinley and Roland Chi. What a crew!

Bankhead, the brain shift-slip octogenarian; McKinkley, the bad cop who littered the Fullerton Police Department with thugs, goons, pickpockets, pill-popping con men, sexual predators, perjurers, and of course murderers; and Roland Chi, the food poisoner from Garden Grove who only escaped prosecution by handing over his DNA to the DA.

Like the unionistas themselves, huge pension recipients Bankhead and McKinley could be safely counted on to curry favor with labor; and oh, they tried so hard after the brazen Kelly Thomas murder at the hands of six Fullerton cops to protect their campaign benefactors. Roland Chi was just a contemptible scofflaw who never should have come out from behind the rancid squid display in the first place.

And all three were safe bets to impose the annual and illegal 10% tax on your water, a tax that goes to pay their own pensions!

And folks this is why we need a recall!

92 Replies to “Never Forget”

      1. Hey haha you are reading this too. You called Wrong Guy and Peckerwood Pete Childish and Moronic. Uh what does that make you?
        Get a life Troll!

  1. Thanks for sharing this image.

    Yep the Three Elderly Amigos are bought and paid for by the unions. Conservative Republicans my ass.

    Thanks Royce for sticking it to Fullerton. I sure hope Miller uses this against you.

    1. Jesus just about the only thing worse than being stuck with Royce is being stuck with Miller, Isn’t he a contender for most crooked member of the house of representatives?

  2. It’s pretty pathetic there are school kids who come on this blog to only post if they are first and last.. And of all things they can’t even use their real names.. F’ing trolls..

    1. How True Erin…
      I believe Peckerwood Pete is his real name. lol
      Sorry I screwed up your 4th position Friendly Neighbor.

  3. A WATER TAX to fund pensions????? Where the hell did that come from??? It wouldn’t surprise me if someday they try to tax the air in Fullerton to fund vacations!!

    1. “No doubt the police report will claim he was reaching for a gun (that will never be found), and then resisted arrest by running to an alley (even though he’s paralyzed from the waist down), where he inexplicably began to bash his own head against a concrete wall until his brains spilled out, and even then managed to choke himself to death.

      It’s amazing what cops have to put up with every day.”

      1. Mom Claims Anaheim Cops Executed Son

        ANAHEIM – The mother of a man shot and killed by Anaheim police in August has filed a claim against the city for “wrongful police execution of her son.”

        In the claim, attorney Richard Herman says that Raya was running away from his girlfriend’s home, where he had seen police officers trying to serve a warrant because he had failed to report to his parole agent.

        “He had run quite a distance … when he was shot and killed by (three) shots in his back,” the claim reads. “These shots were fired by a city of Anaheim police officer who is a member of the … crime task force, which operates as a death squad, basically shooting and killing persons who are felons or ex-felons and supposedly Hispanic gang members.”

        http://www.ocregister.com/news/police-324840-raya-claim.html?nstrack=sid:3182392|met:102|cat:227|order:3

      2. In response to the post by CackleFoos concerning the Nov. 1 news article about the Anaheim shooting:
        I would like to turn the viewers’ attention to California Penal Code section 843: “When the arrest is being made by an officer under the authority of a warrant, AFTER INFORMATION OF THE INTENTION TO MAKE THE ARREST, if the person to be arrested either flees or forcibly resists, the officer may use all necessary means to effect the arrest.” [EMPHASIS added.]
        This law is very, very different from the one which governs a “warrantless arrest”, which is an arrest made without a warrant.
        Until 1957, every schoolchild and every person in this country, just about, knew that “unreasonable” or lethal force could be used to stop an escape from an arrest that was made pursuant to a warrant. It was common knowledge that a law enforcement officer had the authority, if not the duty, to shoot the person who tries to escape from an arrest made pursuant to warrant. OK.
        In the Anaheim case to which your comment links, it was a rare case where a warrant had issued for a “parole hold”. Whether or not the Anaheim policemen who were involved will be found to have acted unlawfully, will all boil down to whether or not the parolee had been given “INFORMATION OF THE INTENTION TO MAKE ARREST [PURSUANT TO A WARRANT].”

        In my opinion, three or four things could have prevented this killing:
        1. Abolish parole. It is just a corrupt system that is calculated to lead to re-carcerations [do not confuse this with “re-incarnations”].
        2. If parole cannot be abolished, then make it a condition of parole that a parolee must make three public demonstrations of his knowledge that a warrant search is different from a warrantless search, and that he or she could be summarily executed for resisting a warrant-related arrest.
        3. Make it a requirement that no one can be issued a junior high diploma, high school diploma, or high school GED unless the student demonstrates mastery of the distinction between warrantless and warrant-related arrests, and demonstrates the knowledge the fleeing an arrest made pursuant to warrant can get you summarily executed.
        4. Live audio recordings of any places where parolees are, so as to establish whether or not the arresting officer has announced an intention to make an arrest PURSUANT TO A WARRANT.

        Do you want some entertainment? Ask a law enforcement officer, whether or not he supports any or all of the above reforms. Then ask him or her to explain why not.
        Best wishes, WSH

        1. Judging by the language in the complaint as quoted above, Mr. Herman seems to be implying that Mr Raya was not properly informed, and that this issue has come up before: he’s describing the task force as a death squad.

          I hope he’s successful in getting a judgment against the city and the officer, and is able to put further restraints in place to limit unbridled police powers.

        2. Great suggestions, Snow Hume. I’d like to add a provision to No. 4:
          In any case where an officer fails to activate his audio recorder and subsequently shoots someone fleeing a warrant arrest, that officer can be held criminally and civilly liable for the injuries or death caused by the firing officer.

          I have a question. The language in CPC 843 doesn’t distinguish between misdemeanor and felony warrants. Are there cases where police have executed someone for fleeing a misdemeanor warrant?

        3. Dear CackleFoos,
          The answer is yes, many people have been executed for resisting arrest pursuant to a warrant that was issued for a misdemeanor crime.

          In historic times, legislators understood that arrests pursuant to warrant were the big opportunity for marshalls and other local law enforcement to murder people with impunity. That is why it is a felony to swear out a misdemeanor crime! Because it might lead to the issuance of an arrest warrant, and that, in turn, could lead to a “privileged” murder by law enforcement.

          It is clear as daylight, that historically there was a problem with widespread refusals by law enforcement to serve arrest warrants, even though they might not hesitate to serve a Summons for a criminal case. You can see the more modern laws that criminalize the dereliction to serve an arrest warrant, and that even allow a marshall to involuntarily conscript an ordinary citizen to serve on a “posse comitatus”.

          And here is why: it is possible for an arrest, pursuant to warrant, to be a false arrest. If the warrant turns out to be void as a matter of law, then Penal Code section 843 will not be applicable. Therefore, resistance by the citizen against whom a void warrant had issued was justified, just as much as it would be for an unlawful “warrantless” arrest.

          So imagine this scenario. You are a policeman. You serve a court-issued warrant. You use lethal violence to enforce it, but some of your colleagues are killed in the process. The warrant turns out to be void. Now, the individuals who served the warrant are guilty of the accused’s murder, as well as the murder of the other peace officers.

          Void, as opposed to “voidable”, arrest warrants are rare, but they do occur. The fact that the magistrate screwed up, or that a private consulting attorney screwed up, can make some “reliance on counsel” defenses to a civil tort action. But “ignorantia lex neminem excusat” — ignorance of the law is no excuse. And all of us, police included, are charged with the knowledge of the contents of all publicly-accessible files, including those for initiation of a criminal case. All of us — all of the people who have not been to law school are included — are presumed to know when probable cause for the issuance of an arrest warrant is lacking, as a matter of law. And accordingly, one has a duty to refuse to act upon it. Just like a public official has a duty to refuse to enforce a judgment that is absolutely void, and subject to “collateral attack”.

          As the world became more complex, society was willing to trade in individual common law liberties in exchange for greater police protection, and the resulting apparent safety. So a series of small incursions into the Common Law system of “law and order” occurred over about 100 years, thus changing the balance of power between individual citizens and law enforcement officers.

          I don’t call for “rolling back” all of these Police State reforms; I think many are necessary for a modern society. The problem I have, is that we refuse to educate the least-powerful element of our society about these things, thus maneuvering them into situations where they can be lawfully executed in an “extrajudicial” manner. That was why I recommended certain things to cause at least parolees to learn this area of law that affects them.
          WSH

          1. I understand a Warrant authorizes an arrest, and a Summons is an order to appear in court to answer a complaint.

            Quote:

            “You can see the more modern laws that criminalize the dereliction to serve an arrest warrant, and that even allow a marshall to involuntarily conscript an ordinary citizen to serve on a ‘posse comitatus’.”

            Q: What about the case where a policeman coaxes a citizen to make a citizen’s arrest, based on information the policeman knows to be false. Would this be the same as swearing out a false warrant?

    2. “He later filed a written personnel complaint against the officers involved. ….Three months later, Avila was killed in an officer-involved shooting.”

      Next time any FFFF reader gets upset at victims of police brutality who don’t file complaints, remember – THIS IS WHY.

    3. Your cops seem to kill an awful lot of people down there. It must be a different culture. I was in Long Beach earlierthis year, and there was NO WAY I was picking up a hose – nozzle or not!

  4. Why would anyone vote for a candidate who takes money from a group with whom they will be negotiating at a later date?

  5. Someone needs to make up a sign, and parade it around calling for the recall of the 3 clowns, and the prosecution of the 6 felons.

  6. I was so fun to watch Travis speak at the city counsel meeting last night. What a frightened fat kitten. Overall it was a great show with the usual social outcasts and dirtbags. The guy talking about radiation and gamma rays is a great addition to the army…keep hitting the long ball!

    1. I was going to watch it online, but watching all those booze addled oddballs ‘making a difference’ is too cringeworthy. It’s doesn’t bode well for a movement when you have to dredge the detoxs and shelters for ‘marchers’. What percentage of ‘the movement’ do you think have jobs and pay taxes and what percent a beneficiaries of the taxpayers while, wringing thier hands over where taxpayer money is going?

      1. “It’s doesn’t bode well for a movement when you have to dredge the detoxs and shelters for ‘marchers’”

        No, we didn’t put up a help wanted sign at the Fullerton College Police Academy.

    2. If you were one of the four gentlemen snickering during the entire meeting, you have been a poor representation of your employer and the city in which you work.

  7. Travis’ skidmark :I was so fun to watch Travis speak at the city counsel meeting last night. What a frightened fat kitten. Overall it was a great show with the usual social outcasts and dirtbags. The guy talking about radiation and gamma rays is a great addition to the army…keep hitting the long ball!

    What was most amusing was all those ‘over -the-hill’ senior citizens in suits and ties speaking so highly of the 3 Senile old oafs.
    Wonder what they were paid to show up and brown-nose?

  8. “Wonder what they were paid to show up and brown-nose?”

    Many of them have already been greased with Redevelopment gravy.

    I have a feeling admin will be doing an explanatory video!

  9. I remember reading up on Roland Chi and the same day getting one if his ads in the mail. Where he claimed he would open up one of his markets in Fullerton to create more jobs. If by jobs he meant emergency room personnel he was correct.

    1. It’s true! Roland Chi’s crimes were a growth industry. Sponsored by the FPOA. Remember Roland’s pop, the sign thief. FFFF gave the coppers the guys face and license plate # and Fullerton’s Finest couldn’t solve the caper!

  10. I arrived about 10 minutes after the public comments last night and missed Ron Thomas’ comments.
    Unfortunately when he confronted McKInley as to ‘when Ramos and Ciss went from police officers to murderers’, he got cut off. We so needed to hear McKinley’s response to that, knowing it would be as lame as his explaination that he meant to say “Those women were not credible witnesses, according to the DA”, as opposed to “Those women were not like THESE people.”
    WHAT a BIGGOTED, RETRACTING, JUDGEMENTAL, MENTAL, AND FULL-OF-HIMSELF JACKASS!!!
    I’m certain SATAN has a luxury suite awaiting him in HELL.

  11. L.A. NOW
    Southern California — this just in

    74-year-old fatally beaten with baseball bat inside a Wal-Mart
    November 2, 2011 | 5:45 am

    A 74-year-old man was fatally beaten with a baseball bat Tuesday inside a Lakewood Wal-Mart in what authorities believe was an unprovoked attack by a homeless man.

    The incident occurred in the sporting-goods section of a Wal-Mart on Carson Street in Lakewood.

    A 47-year-old man was taken into custody by Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department officials.

    “Witnesses have drawn the conclusion that the suspect is homeless,” Lt. Eddie Hernandez told City News Service. “We haven’t confirmed that. … The victim was in the sporting-goods section. The suspect approached him and started to attack him with a baseball bat, causing severe head trauma.”

    Hernandez said the incident was caught on a security video.

    The Wal-Mart was closed for hours as police investigated.

    I thought homeless people were all cute and innocent and loveable.

    1. However quaint and charming the homeless may be the basic fact is that when you’re homeless, you shoplift. I was a liason for the homeless for 15 years. 99% of my time was dealing with thefts and bailing them out after shoplifting arrests, plus, of course random assults, public defacation, vandalism, etc.

    2. They don’t know if he was homeless. I’m sure psychopaths are not thinking about taking a bath, changing their clothes or combing their hair.

      1. The pictures of Cicinelli are typical of a homeless person. In fact, the Cicinelli crime and the Walmart crime are indistinguishable based on the appearance of the perpetrator and the randomness of the crime.

        Conclusion:
        Fullerton cops are no better than psychopathic homeless people who randomly murder their victims in public places.

  12. TB-what the hell you talking about Boy? shorley you aint comparin Kelly Thomas to that wing nut? shoot, anyone with half a brain knows thats like comparin a badger with a hound dog- we aint all the same you no account varmit

  13. Erin :
    HAHAHAHA I know who you are…. Silly..

    LOLOLOLOL…see you guys tomorrow.

    @Friendly Neighbor: Are we still meeting up at your place? Call me dude.

  14. Travis’ skidmark :I was so fun to watch Travis speak at the city counsel meeting last night. What a frightened fat kitten. Overall it was a great show with the usual social outcasts and dirtbags. The guy talking about radiation and gamma rays is a great addition to the army…keep hitting the long ball!

    What a nut case…Very good representitive.

  15. Wrong Guy :

    Travis’ skidmark :I was so fun to watch Travis speak at the city counsel meeting last night. What a frightened fat kitten. Overall it was a great show with the usual social outcasts and dirtbags. The guy talking about radiation and gamma rays is a great addition to the army…keep hitting the long ball!

    What was most amusing was all those ‘over -the-hill’ senior citizens in suits and ties speaking so highly of the 3 Senile old oafs.Wonder what they were paid to show up and brown-nose?

    No one paid them…they arent part of Bushala’s clan.

  16. Scooter :TB-what the hell you talking about Boy? shorley you aint comparin Kelly Thomas to that wing nut? shoot, anyone with half a brain knows thats like comparin a badger with a hound dog- we aint all the same you no account varmit

    When the officers trial starts..you’ll see what a outstanding citizen your sweet Kelly Thomas was.

    1. The same will be said when the Fullerton cops are lying in a pool of blood with their heads caved in. Are you scared?

  17. Spokane Police Officer Convicted In Fatal Beating

    A former Los Angeles police officer working in Spokane, Wash., was convicted by a federal jury Wednesday of using excessive force in the beating of a mentally ill man who died after being struck with batons, hogtied, shocked and smothered.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/nationnow/2011/11/police-beating-excessive-force-thompson-zehm-spokane.html

    [ I would not be one bit surprised to discover Pat McKinley was this man’s mentor at LAPD. ]

    1. “I would not be one bit surprised to discover Pat McKinley was this man’s mentor at LAPD. ”

      LAPD again!!!!

      From the article above:

      “The officer worked for the Los Angeles Police Department from 1969 into the 1970s, prosecutors said, when, like many ex-Los Angeles police officers, he moved to northern Idaho. He joined the Spokane department’s patrol division in 1997.”

      I am NOT surprised!

      1. It’s uncanny how much the details resemble what they did to Kelly – almost as if they WERE TRAINED TO DO IT THAT WAY.

        God only knows what Pat McKinley has done. His murderous cops have spread like contagion all over the country.

        I added the other two stories as a poke in the eye to the cops who keep coming in here making snarky comments, but they show a pattern of buffoonery and lethality that seems to be a Pat McKinley trademark.

  18. Police: Man Being Ticketed Runs Over Cop’s Legs

    GARDEN GROVE – A driver stopped for not having his seat belt on struggled with a motorcycle officer, then ran over his legs as he fled from a parking lot Wednesday morning, police said.

    http://www.ocregister.com/news/officer-325066-car-driver.html

    [ LMFAO! The bozo tried to stop the driver by leaning into the car and got run over. Another Cicinelli in the making! ]

  19. Police Identify Car Break-in Suspect Killed In Shooting

    Authorities say Bitz ignored the officer’s commands to stop running and raise his hands, and somehow got into the driver’s seat of the officer’s car.

    The officer reportedly shot Bitz, sheriff’s officials say, after he reached for his waistband.

    Authorities have not indicated whether a weapon was found on or near Bitz or commented on how many shots were fired.

    [ PREDICTION: No gun will be found. Witnesses will state the victim was trying to surrender when he was shot 3 times in the back. ]

      1. Quote:
        “PREDICTION: No gun will be found. Witnesses will state the victim was trying to surrender when he was shot 3 times in the back.”
        ———————————————

        Man Killed By Off-duty Cop In Lakewood Was Unarmed, Officials Say

        A man who was shot and killed by an off-duty Santa Ana police officer Monday was unarmed, a Sheriff’s Department official said Thursday.

        The officer told sheriff’s officials that Bitz reached into his waistband and the officer fired his gun four times.

        http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/11/man-killed-by-off-duty-officer-in-lakewood-was-unarmed.html

        [ This isn’t fun anymore, the details are too predictable. ]

  20. CackleFoos :The same will be said when the Fullerton cops are lying in a pool of blood with their heads caved in. Are you scared?

    Nope..cause we are all gonna see the truth.

  21. Anonymous :

    CackleFoos :The same will be said when the Fullerton cops are lying in a pool of blood with their heads caved in. Are you scared?

    Nope..cause we are all gonna see the truth.

    Anonymous :

    CackleFoos :The same will be said when the Fullerton cops are lying in a pool of blood with their heads caved in. Are you scared?

    Nope..cause we are all gonna see the truth.

    Wow sounds like a threat…Admin document this.

    1. Computer threat. He talks a lot online because he barely goes outside in real life. Sheltered. Internet gives people like him a voice. 🙂

      1. I notice you never waste any time replying to posts. Wattsa matter, too many years in the driver’s seat of a Crown Vic left you with pilonidal cysts?

          1. A large part of this class is about the Fullerton investigation. Pretty interesting. DA part of it. Learning a lot.

  22. CackleFoos, please try to refrain from language like that. I completely understand your frustration, but it only hurts the cause and gives people more ammunition against anyone who supports the recall and/or is upset about what happened in the aftermath of Kelly Thomas’s death.

  23. “Interesting” – I understand your concern. I was referring to the fate of the cops who beat Kelley Thomas to death when they’re imprisoned. My understanding is cops frequently end up victims of horrific assault by other inmates. Ironic in this case, don’t you agree?

    As for the Anonymous poster who claims this was a threat, document all you want. Only a pig would claim free speech is a threat.

          1. Well, it looks as if police officers who are sent to prison for committing crimes are sent to a different facility so as to protect them from other inmates. So I guess it would make sense if there are no reports of officers being beaten in prison.

            However, it’s difficult to say because searching online for any combination of the terms “cop,” “police officer,” “jail,” “inmates,” and “beating” results mostly in a display of stories about police officers being accused of beating inmates. (To clarify, I’m saying that in a neutral way. Those are just the stories you see, not that they’re true or false necessarily.)

            1. I think it’s safe to say if there’s a policy of segregating cops from the general population it’s based on a history, regardless if that history is accessible from the internet.

    1. Thanks for writing back, CackleFoos. I believe that’s true that police officers don’t fare well in the general population in prisons. That makes me think of how the people I feel bad for (other than the Thomas family, of course) are the family members of the two officers who have been charged.

      1. I agree. Violence always has collateral damage. The cops’ families, and even the conscientious cops in FPD, are victims.

        What really frosts me is the attitude of the neanderthals who apparently think it’s a privilege and a sport to harass, intimidate, and brutalize citizens using their authority.

        1. Yes, I feel the exact same way about the other officers in the FPD who are victims as well. And I agree that the arrogant attitude of the officers who abuse their authority is also very frustrating (probably for their coworkers as well)!

          1. Being a former cop myself, I understand the fawning reverence some people give to the badge and gun. I also understand the camaraderie that makes one want to protect his fellow officers.

            But what I don’t understand is the vicious delight dirty cops get in harassing and intimidating people. And I don’t understand why the problem is so widespread.

            If there is going to be significant reform in law enforcement it has to start from within. Loudmouth pricks like me can only nip at the heels, not affect change.

  24. When former LEOs enter a county jail or state prison facility, as soon as their status is discovered in intake they are separated from the other prisoners.

    A former cop can never (nor would they want to) “walk the mainline”. Generally speaking they spend the entirety of their sentence in PC (protecetive custody), with others who can’t walk the mainline-rats, child molesters, gang dropouts, etc.

  25. Honestly, having a pilonidal cyst was terrible. Such pain, such agony. If only i’d found this site before, I would have known what was to come!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.