Cicinelli LAPD Pension Safe; Too Bad Fullerton Wasn’t Safe From Cicinelli

The guy who pounded Kelly Thomas’ face to bloody jelly (right after he got done torturing him with multiple Taser shocks) won’t lose his disability pension from the LAPD. In fact, the board that oversees such things won’t even review the case. Marisa Gerber relates the story in the OC Weekly, here.

What case is that? It stems from Cicinelli’s getting all shot to hell a few weeks out of the chute back in the mid-90’s. Among other injuries, one of his eyes was shot out. At the time, the pension board granted him a lifetime disability, but of course that decision didn’t contemplate Cicinelli going back to work as a one-eyed cop, which he did in Fullerton a little while later. And apparently nobody from Fullerton bothered to inform anybody in LA of Cicinelli’s new employment status.

So Cicinelli was making $40K a year from LAPD and made about $90K from Fullerton on that hot, sultry night of July 5th, 2011. Equitable? You decide.

Speaking of getting two pensions, I now roll around to the main point of this post. Which is Pat McKinley, the double barreled pension grabber who, as chief of the Fullerton Police Department hired Cicinelli and deployed the one-eyed cop on the streets of Fullerton. It was a favor for an old LAPD crony. In so doing, he placed Cicinelli, the public, and the taxpaying citizenry at dire risk.

He also hired the rest of the FPD gallery of rogues that has made the news lately: the druggies, pickpockets, perjurers, thugs, sex offenders and killers.

McKinley still insists he is proud of all these people (except for “the two!”) and has nothing to apologize for.

See, in Pat’s weird world mistakes are never admitted, responsibility for failure is never taken, and of course, accountability is utterly absent. McKinley won’t acknowledge what everybody else already knows: during his tenure as the head of the Fullerton Police Department his leadership failure created an obvious Culture of Corruption that culminated with the death of Kelly Thomas and the subsequent attempt to hush it up.

Well, I guess since McKinley won’t man up to his own failures, we’re going to have to do it for him

 

 

Behind Closed Doors Dead heads Dick Jones Don Bankhead Ed Royce Law N Disorder Patdown Pat McPension Repuglicanism The Crime Beat Union Goons Watch Your Wallet

118 thoughts on “Cicinelli LAPD Pension Safe; Too Bad Fullerton Wasn’t Safe From Cicinelli

  1. Well, the settlements are coming. It’s going to get to the point where the City won’t be able to hush up the ugly.

  2. I wonder what he thinks about at night when he goes to sleep and when he first wakes up in the morning. It has to be a bitch, but he’ll never admit it.

    1. McKinley must have developed a defense mechanism of shunting accountability that has served him well over the years. For example, he was unprepared when the women who attended his She Bear meeting asked tough questions about the longevity of Officer Rincon’s creepy behavior.
      The sudden, glaring exposure of his hypocrisy must have been excruciatingly painful. Just watching the video of that event was uncomfortable. The old standby excuse that the DA hadn’t done anything about Rincon so he must be a great cop doesn’t sit well when everyone in the room has their “sixth sense” tuned in. Therefore, Rincon must be an alien from another planet who hijacked his badge.

      By the time the next city council meeting rolled around again, he had regained his composure and simple reasoning. Rincon was a good cop. The DA had said as much. Those citizens who dared ask tough questions about accountability had hijacked his meeting.
      To be sure, he has developed some skewed logic that justifies paying “those women” a huge settlement. The next thing hijacked just may be his council seat.

  3. I’m curious to know who the third individual is (AKA: police officer) who the Fed’s are going to charge after the DA’s case is concluded.

  4. McKinley has been more pathetic that all 3 put together. He is a perfect example of how twisted one could get from holding a high ranking position in law enforcement without adult supervision.

  5. Is this state so damn screwed up that it will continue to pay a pension to a soon-to-be convicted murderer? That is just so damn wrong!! Also, where is the money going to continue coming from to pay these pensions? California is broke NOW! Jerry Brown is a union supporting hack! The state legislature is basically a one-party dictatorship, as elections do not seem to change anything. The problem goes well beyond Fullerton and people need to wake up to that fact because California is now circling the drain!

  6. I can understand that a disability pension should not keep you from being able to work, at at the exact same job you’re supposedly too disabled for? If ol’ oneye was fit to be a beat cop (ha), he never should have gotten a disability pension in the first place. And if he’s a beat cop now, then it undermines the very premise of the disability pension.

    So, huh?

    1. Isnt that fraud?

      If a construction worker claims disability and is caught doing construction again, don’t they charge them with fraud?

    2. Precisely. Bernard Parks widely overruled his gung-ho subordinate Hillman, who then turned to McKinley for the big favor.

      Only problem is, McKinley’s rolled the dice on Fullerton’s dime.

    3. At the time they gave him the disability pension he could barely walk and was severely disabled. It took years of rehab to recover. You only get one year after the injury to recover or you are retired. So he recovered and applied at Fullerton and was hired. That’s the simple version. The complex part is the being hired again and having to get rid of the disability pension. No rules or laws specified he had to, or has to, so it is what it is I guess. That wouldn’t happen if LAPD was in PERS. it only happened because they are two separate and unrelated retirement systems.

  7. I dont think it was worker comp was it? i thought it was diability pension- cant work if youre on work comp, collecting temporary benes but can if you are not

    1. Actually, you can work while on workers’ comp; won’t necessarily receive monetary benefits, but will receive medically needed benefits… I know, I did – for about one week 🙂

      And, even if you receive a Workers’ Comp “award” for an injury? You can continue to work. Example – back injury that is essentially healed, but may require what is called “future medical” benefits in the event of a flare up… PLUS, have to add ADA into the Workers’ Comp mix.

  8. Cincielli is one sick sociopath! To smash the face of another human that did nothing to provoke you is insane.

    As far as people like McKinley go, they are only looking for money and power, the lot of the “little people” his type watch over is about fear and greed and political cowardice that now pervade almost all members of the PS feeders RAGWUS. 😉

    1. Sissynelly- is damaged goods, his cheeky wife knows it. The fact that he tried to beat the very face off Kelly Thomas, a homeless man, who frankly was more attractive then Sissynelly and he couldnt take it. Anyone with psych 101- can read into this one. Sissynelly rolls up on a scene where a homeless guys clear unblemished face is under you- the very thing you want more than anything to look normal…..and here this guy that is homeless, looks better then you…go ahead jay boy beat him up….hello Ms Sissynelly- you are as sick as your rotten husband. Ms Sissynelly – he beats you to doesnt he?

  9. How would the city ever get back to paying normal wages to police officers outside of dismembering the dept and rebuilding it from scratch.

  10. Ran a name analysis on Jay Cicinelli….
    The first name of Jay creates an intense personal nature.

    Your feelings and emotional desires are strong and consequently you are an individual, determined, strong-willed person.

    Your creative nature and ambition drive you to pursue success to the extent that you jeopardize your personal well-being.

    There is a tendency for you to dominate others.

    You are too certain of yourself, and you are not open to the views of others or responsive to their desires or needs.

    Also, this name does not incorporate qualities that enable you to be diplomatic and to compromise.
    Although the name Jay creates the urge to be creative and original, we point out that it causes an emotional intensity and a dominating nature that is hard to control.

    This name, when combined with the last name, can frustrate happiness, contentment, and success, as well as cause health weaknesses in the nervous system, and tension or accidents to the head.

  11. “And apparently nobody from Fullerton bothered to inform anybody in LA of Cicinelli’s new employment status.” Is that the responsibility of the City of Fullerton or the officer in question? But I guess the point should have been made that if LAPD was sending him a disability pension then he was, by definition, not able to do the job of a police officer. Put simply, McKinely put his loyalty to his friends at LAPD above the safety of the people of Fullerton, and a man ultimately paid for this hubris with his life.

    1. I’m sure it was Cicinelli’s legal responsibility which means another no-no comitted by a McKinley brand cop.

      Still, McKinley knew he had a disability pension and at the very least should have made notification of the LA pension board a condition of hire for Cicinelli.

      I’m sure McKinley saw nothing wrong with getting two pensions.

  12. Send them all to federal prison, assigned to the general population. That will give them the same chance they gave Kelly!

  13. Reality Is :I heard he’s providing security in a chair on the porch of Cicinelli and Ramos’ houses.

    yep I heard they were having a contest who could eat the most krispy kreme’s. And krispy kreme had to open two new stores in foolertown.

  14. budget therapist :Ran a name analysis on Jay Cicinelli….The first name of Jay creates an intense personal nature.
    Your feelings and emotional desires are strong and consequently you are an individual, determined, strong-willed person.
    Your creative nature and ambition drive you to pursue success to the extent that you jeopardize your personal well-being.
    There is a tendency for you to dominate others.
    You are too certain of yourself, and you are not open to the views of others or responsive to their desires or needs.
    Also, this name does not incorporate qualities that enable you to be diplomatic and to compromise.Although the name Jay creates the urge to be creative and original, we point out that it causes an emotional intensity and a dominating nature that is hard to control.
    This name, when combined with the last name, can frustrate happiness, contentment, and success, as well as cause health weaknesses in the nervous system, and tension or accidents to the head.

    dr totts says
    first name jay means your a bird
    last name cicinelli means your a pasta eatin wop.
    having one eye means you liked popeye growing up.
    A REAL LOW BUDGET SHRINK

  15. Fontana Police Department wants to buy two helicopters

    Jim Steinberg, Staff Writer
    Created: 11/20/2011 06:03:39 AM PST

    The Fontana Police Department on Tuesday will ask city councl to approve its purchase of two Robinson helicopters, including this R66 turbine-powered model. (Photo courtesy of Robinson Helicopter Co.)
    FONTANA – The Fontana Police Department wants to buy two helicopters – for about $1.6 million – saying it can run a more responsive air patrol program for less money than what it is now paying a contractor.
    The move comes at a time when many cities, caught in a financial squeeze, have been forced to end their aviation programs.

    A few months ago, for example, Costa Mesa and Newport Beach terminated a longstanding joint helicopter patrol program.

    “The program was extremely valuable for the department, but when it came down to the budget, tough decisions had to be made,” said Kathy Lowe, information officer for the Newport Beach Police Department.

    Police Chief Rodney Jones on Tuesday will ask city council’s okay to use $500,000 in asset seizure funds to purchase an almost new Robinson R44 Police Edition helicopter for $415,000 and spend another $85,000 to install more advanced equipment on it.

    Asset seizure funds are obtained during arrests in drug cases. One of the allowed uses of those funds is to purchase police aviation equipment, Jones said.

    A new Robinson 44 equipped for police use costs more than $800,000, Jones said.

    The used helicopter Fontana plans to buy has only 140 hours of flight time on it, Jones said.

    Robinson Helicopter Co. of Torrance has recently developed a more powerful turbine engine model called the R66.

    The first R66 Police Edition will be released in July 2012. Jones said he would also like to purchase one of those because it can fly with more weight. Its more powerful turbine engine will help it retain lift power during hot days, something which pilots in R44s must carefully monitor, he said.

    The department will receive “financial incentives” for that purchase because it will be one first departments to buy one, Jones said. Even with those incentives, the helicopter will cost about $1.1 million.

    Jones said he plans to tap the asset seizure fund to get a $300,000 downpayment on the R66 and take a fifteen year lease that will cost $72,000 annually.

    The department would likely pay off the lease to own the helicopter out-right within three years. The source for lease payment and the helicopter’s purchase would be asset money, Jones said.

    Jones said he wants two helicopters because of the significant down-time needed for maintainance and overhauls.

    Fontana Police Department has a helicopter contract with California Aviation Services of Riverside costing $497,250 per year.

    CAS provides a R44 helicopter and its pilot while the Fontana Police department provides an officer as an observer.

    Jones said the more powerful R66 would allow a third person in the cockpit, allowing its mission to include firefighting observation and command.

    In situations where quick response is needed to a large fire, an observer from the fire department could accompany the police observer during flights, Jones said.

    “The helicopter allows us to do more with less,” Jones said.

    “At a time of decreased staffing, the need for an aviation program can not be overstated. On average, the helicopter is first on the scene 66 percent of the time. On many calls, this alleviates the need for any type of patrol response,” Jones said.

    By owning its own helicopters, annual recurring costs from the general fund would amount to $489,333 annually, some $10,000 less than the $497,250 the city pays California Aviation Services, Jones said.

    Cost could decrease significantly, he said, if Colton and Rialto decided they would want access to Fontana’s air patrols in exchange for financial and personnel support.

    “I like the concept,” said City Councilman Michael Tahan. “It gives more resources to the police and frees up more officers on the ground.”

    “This use of seizure money gets a good benefit for our community,” said Mayor Acquanetta Warren, who added that the speed of a helicopter is needed to get police across town in a hurry.

    1. nah H stands for hair-on, the main thang in doc jiz-owns oxytoxins.
      oh tell ya mama i clean outa da cryz-ank butts gotz da riz-ock

  16. Too bad McKinley can’t see the error of his ways.

    ______________________________________________
    Paramilitary Policing From Seattle to Occupy Wall Street
    Norm Stamper November 9, 2011 |

    “…the police response to the Occupy movement, most disturbingly visible in Oakland—where scenes resembled a war zone and where a marine remains in serious condition from a police projectile—brings into sharp relief the acute and chronic problems of American law enforcement.”

    ~Norm Stamper, Retired Seattle Chief of Police.

    http://www.thenation.com/article/164501/paramilitary-policing-seattle-occupy-wall-street

    1. Imagine if there wasn’t pension protection for everyone in this world. They would have ripped the pensions from people just because they wanted to. OJ, cops, doctors, lawyers, and others. Thank god they are protected and can’t be touched.

        1. Whatcha mean? You referring to the financial future picture or the ripping of earned pensions from people you feel have done wrong?

          1. RI, the PS RAGWUS pensions are the product of fraud upon the people of California. A crooked scheme of buying politicians to feed your organizations greed.

            In a few years, when the money really runs out, you will find that your greed was bigger than could be sustained, and you will only have yourself to blame. Pull your head out dude, it is all caving in on you costumed clowns! 😉

            1. Time will tell. As I said before, it’s benefits that were provided statewide by every PD in the state, and the nation for that matter. Adjustments are being made daily now, and if it crashes and burns as you predict, then so be it. Whatever is supposed to happen will happen. I have faith, you don’t. If you think that PERS members are going to offer back their retirements, you are lost. I think the adjustments being made will make the system survive. We will talk again in 10 years and see how it’s going.

          2. Reality Is :Whatcha mean? You referring to the financial future picture or the ripping of earned pensions from people you feel have done wrong?

            Both. I know you’re holding onto your dreams as tightly as you can, but folks who won’t let go of the handrails go down with the ship.

            If you can’t see the lifeboats being lowered you’re too close to the problem. How long can you hold your breath?

            1. Not sure what you are saying.

              Nothing anyone can do. You saying I can do something?

              Only thing anyone can do is hold on. if it sinks it sinks. No one can get their years back. No one can invest differently. It is what it is. If PERS sinks it doesn’t matter at that point because at that point the state is done so we will all be in the same boat.

              Bad decisions by all the cities. They paid nothing for pensions for 10 years. They should have saved that money for times like these. I guess everyone should have.

              All everyone can do is sit back and watch it all unfold.

              1. The problem is the size of the pensions RI and the 32 ways the PS feeders enhanced their pay by spiking, along with all the phoony disability claims at retirement.

                Don’t pin this to the cities, counties and state my friend. It is your PS RAGWUS that created the unsustainable pension tsunami and all the machinations it entails. 😉

                1. Ok. That’s where we will have to disagree. Blame the politicians then. Standard negotiations you see everyday in every profession. No one said a word when it was happening, but now cry foul.

                  Yea well disability retirements aren’t going anywhere. They will rise actually. With cops working until 60, disability pensions and workers comp claims will double.

                  So yea. Lose lose no matter what happens.

                2. The politicians are owned by you and your PS RAGWUS RI. You are not separate, you are joined at the hips my friend. You PS crooks created the RAGWUS and now you want to distance yoursleves from your very own creation. It is not going to happen. The internet has passed on the truth about your thieving cabal. In the past you were able to hide behind layers of bureaucracy while you spun your evil and greedy webs. No longer can you blame the Politicians for your acts, because in the end you own the politicians and they did just what you crooks wanted.

                  The younger generations will not be your slaves and it will hurt ! 😉

              2. I guess not everyone can see the trainwreck up ahead. The future is for survivors, not retirees. The smart thing to do is get land away from the mega-infrastructures and become self-sufficient. The power grid, water lines, sewers, groceries, everything we take for granted is not going to be there. Clothing, seeds, water purification, biodiesel or other fuel stocks – those are going to be the currency of the future.

                Look around, things are changing. Or hold on and hope things stay the same. Good luck.

    2. I have news for you. and the rest of Satan’s sycchophants, the Orange County District Attorney’s offices will only be the initial stop of Jay and Manny’sextended tour through the Federal courts which will follow once this current case is brought to verdict…guaranteed.

      1. And if that’s what is decided, then that’s the way it should be. I’m sure everyone involved is ready for that phase as well.

        1. The very fact that you reply at all is suspicious. You say you enjoy the debate, but when you post we can all read between the lines. You’re a mouth piece for LE.

  17. Even if Ramos and Cicinelli are found not guilty in criminal court, any settlement of civil charges can still result in their being terminated from their employment. Happens all the time. Cicinelli will make out cause he will have two pensions (He learned from Pat McPension!) But Ramos has 5 mouths to feed and I assume a wife and he will be in a world of hurt. Why oh why didn’t he think of that before he let himself and Cicinelli get out of hand? Why didn’t his other “friends” watching this like Officer Wolfe stop him? What kind of buddy is that? Was Fullerton PD so corrupt that everyone just stood by and watched? Some buddies!!

        1. Nope. Just guessed. I guess he has 13 years. Maybe he will get 13 years in jail and then get his pension when he walks out? Hmmmmm.

  18. No one is distancing anything. No one is hiding. Everyone is proud of their pay and benefits and will tell you that everyday. The pay and benefits are fair and appropriate. Changing them isn’t easy as everyone is finding out. Reality is clear. How it plays out is open for debate. You feel one way. I feel everyone will survive. 🙂

    Donkey :
    The politicians are owned by you and your PS RAGWUS RI. You are not separate, you are joined at the hips my friend. You PS crooks created the RAGWUS and now you want to distance yoursleves from your very own creation. It is not going to happen. The internet has passed on the truth about your thieving cabal. In the past you were able to hide behind layers of bureaucracy while you spun your evil and greedy webs. No longer can you blame the Politicians for your acts, because in the end you own the politicians and they did just what you crooks wanted.
    The younger generations will not be your slaves and it will hurt !

    1. RI, your entire RAGWUS organization did all the stealing behind closed doors. None of the thieving was done in the open. Your RAGWUS made deals with your bought and paid for politicians in the belief that the people would never resist you bums. Well the cat is out of the bag now you crook and that people that are forced to stay in California will not be your slaves, you will be taking a big cut! 😉

            1. and when the tax payers have no more money, that means nobody can pay speeding tickets. So poor piggies wont have no more donuts, no more gas to waste in go fast piggy cars or fancy flying birds. poor piggy gonna have to walk to arrest people. and that is reality for the little piggy

          1. $250 billion net worth. Pay out $10 billion a year in benefits. We need a major crash and all the cities to go bankrupt. I guess that’s what you are predicting. Standby!! 🙂

  19. Gang Leader Sentenced in Drug Case

    Mike Cruz, Writer
    Published: Nov 21, 2011 6:24 PM
    A leader in a local street gang, who bears a distinctive tattoo showing his dislike for San Bernardino law enforcement, was recently sentenced to state prison in a drug sales case.

    Charles Owens Jr. was sentenced to 11 years in state prison, under the terms of a plea bargain, during an appearance Friday in San Bernardino Superior Court.

    Owens, 29, pleaded guilty to multiple felony counts on Mar. 7 before Judge Duke Rouse in connection with a bust by San Bernardino police two months earlier.

    Prosecutors say Owens later tried to withdraw his guilty plea, but he stopped that effort Friday and was sentenced before Judge Harold Wilson. He received credit for 315 days already served in custody, which included credit for good behavior.

    Three other defendants – Tyrees David Dobson, Thomaso Smith and Eden Habtegiorgis – are awaiting trial in the case. Another man, Jaquan Whitley, also took a plea bargain and was sentenced in April to two years in state prison.

    With this latest conviction, Owens now has five strikes on his record, said Deputy District Attorney Ron Webster, who prosecuted the case. Any new felony offense by Owens could result in a life term in prison, he said.

    Webster credited Ernie Bastarache, a state parole agent, with helping to track down and monitor Owens.

    “We owe a big thank to the parole office and Agent Ernie Bastarache for the work they did to help bring this case to a conclusion,” said Webster.

    San Bernardino police officers were directed to the Valley Motel, near Mount Vernon Avenue and 16th Street, by a state parole officer who reported that Owens’ GPS device indicated he was at the location.

    As police pulled up to the motel, officers could hear people leaving out a back window. Officers made their way to the back, where they found Smith in the rear window and someone else fleeing.

    Owens closed the window on officers, and Dobson slammed a front door to slow officers from coming inside, police said Jan. 24 at a preliminary hearing in Superior Court.

    In the motel room’s bathroom, officers eventually found three people – Owens, Whitley and Hebtegiorgis – flushing the toilet. Floating on top of the water was a plastic bag with 18 bindles of cocaine, according to police.

    A loaded gun was also found in the motel room.

    Owens holds a leadership role in the Inland Empire Projects street gang, say prosecutors and police. On Mar. 7, he pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance for sale, possession of a controlled substance while armed with a loaded firearm, participating in a criminal street gang and being a felon in possession of a firearm, court records state.

    Last year, Owens’ back tattoo became a point of discussion during a trial in San Bernardino Superior Court for Terrell Markham, who was later convicted of brandishing a gun on a police officer.

    The tattoo shows a police officer falling backward while one man stomps on him and another fires a gun at him. A masked face pointing a shotgun is below the officer, and “187 SBPD” is scrawled across Owens’ shoulderblades. 187 of the California Penal Code section for murder.

    Contact Mike via email or by phone at 909-386-3880.

    San Bernardino The Sun

    1. Who gives a shit, could you stop posting random crap. I mean the irrelevant article variety of random crap, carry on with your homespun brand. Thanks.

  20. The hacker collective Anonymous has posted the home address and cell phone number (and work info) for Sgt Pepper, the brutal UC Davis paperpusher who peppersprayed the protesters.

    Question for Reality Is: Do you think I should post the info on here?

    1. You can do anything you want Cackle.

      I think posting things such as that should be done if there is a reason for doing it. He is a Lieutenant also. But what would posting a home address accomplish for anything? He did what he thought he should to release grasp and take people to jail. Now he’s being investigated for it. I think he will keep his job.

      Home addresses are easy to get these days. Simple. Posting them just makes no sense though. There are crazy crazy people in this world and what better opportunity to show how crazy you than to take out people camped in front of your own house? House is supposed to be security. Your home. Your family. Just makes no sense to me when people start mixing the home with work.

      But the good thing about America is you can do anything you want and if you do wrong, you face the consequences. You, me, we all do. I don’t really think that you think posting home addresses is appropriate. At least that’s what I get from you thus far.

      1. Huh, the good thing about America when you’re a cop is you rarely face consequences. If you do something wrong, the police apparatus claims it didn’t happen, or if you did it it wasn’t wrong, or if it was wrong you didn’t mean it, or even if you meant it, it doesn’t warrant serious punishment, and even if it does the officer should get a pass since being a cop is ‘hard’, and really what does ‘wrong’ mean anyway.

    1. I’m waiting to see what RI’s response will be. He posted a link to a LA Times article about a FOIA request for the names of every peace officer in California. It looked like a honeypot to me, but maybe he has a point that he’s trying to make.

      1. It’s just a touchy subject as I stated above. I think jeopardizing people’s safety for no reason isn’t smart. So you release all the names just for fun. Now everyone has a full and complete list, a list with full names. Well now they can just go around and pull up personal information, home addresses, phone numbers, emails just for fun. Why?

        1. Here’s where I stand on it: I don’t think it’s right to subject his family to what’s almost certainly coming down the pike. If he was a man he’d move his family out of the house to a secure location and take the heat on his own.

          But then if he was a man he wouldn’t be in this mess in the first place. I’m afraid it’s going to be Kent State all over again before they get those assholes under control.

          1. Make sense. I think people think these incidents have more of an effect on the cops outside lives. Most cops honestly and sincerely feel they did right and as they were trained. They stand by that. They fight any discipline as such. So I think in the pepper spray incident he feels that way and outside of work, it will have no affect on his outside life. I also think he will be fine and he will be working again. Seeing that he is an LT maybe he will just retire too. Who knows.

            1. It would be nice if the local Guvments adopted the military way of doing pensions. Get busted doing something such as a felony or the like before you get your pension….. bye bye pension. Some higher up officers are covered up for but the rest will mostly lose their pensions….. Comparing a football player already getting a pension, and cops killing someone on duty before they file for a pension is about as far away from each other as you can get.

  21. Reality Is :Make sense. I think people think these incidents have more of an effect on the cops outside lives. Most cops honestly and sincerely feel they did right and as they were trained. They stand by that. They fight any discipline as such. So I think in the pepper spray incident he feels that way and outside of work, it will have no affect on his outside life. I also think he will be fine and he will be working again. Seeing that he is an LT maybe he will just retire too. Who knows.

    They were asked to leave. They were all interlocked. What do you expect? You know how hard it would be to try to pull them apart. Someone is gonna get hurt..Why should the officer risk himself? If people dont listen, the hell with them.

    1. Like everything, there is always more video and more to it.

      Based on this video, I think there choice was very thought out. They had given numerous advisals and warnings. They told the leader what was going to happen. The group even covered up refusing to move or disperse. They were in an area that they were not allowed to be in. Blocking a public right of way. I think in the end they will all be cleared of any wrong doing. They even fought and resisted and pulled away after being sprayed.

      From a PR standpoint the short video clip doesn’t look good. In a criminal or civil court, I don’t think it will go anywhere. We will see. I like the OC choice here better than baton cranks on arms and wrists, which usually causes breaks and severe bruising. A least with OC it’s a flush and back to normal.

      Another interesting case to follow.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8Uj1cV97XQ&feature=player_embedded

  22. Like everything, there is always more video and more to it.

    Based on this video, I think there choice was very thought out. They had given numerous advisals and warnings. They told the leader what was going to happen. The group even covered up refusing to move or disperse. They were in an area that they were not allowed to be in. Blocking a public right of way. I think in the end they will all be cleared of any wrong doing. They even fought and resisted and pulled away after being sprayed.

    From a PR standpoint the short video clip doesn’t look good. In a criminal or civil court, I don’t think it will go anywhere. We will see. I like the OC choice here better than baton cranks on arms and wrists, which usually causes breaks and severe bruising. A least with OC it’s a flush and back to normal.

    Another interesting case to follow.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8Uj1cV97XQ&feature=player_embedded

    🙁

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